Nino Kapanadze

The cruellest month
9 rue des Cascades, Paris

X

The cruellest month by Nino Kapanadze
Raising colours, arising emotions

A particular tonality emerges from Nino Kapanadze’s most recent paintings, a light, an atmosphere, all the more perceptible from one picture to the next as the formats are identical – comfortable for the body that paints, welcoming to the viewer, taken vertically or horizontally. The paintings are either isolated or adjoined. Discreetly, beyond and beneath the subjects being depicted, there is a propulsion towards a purely pictorial and sensorial quest, focussed on the painted space and the emotions that may arise there. Everything here – trees, human figures, books, even walls or other architectural elements – becomes manifest as a more or less fleeting presence, an emanation, an apparition on the verge of visibility, which is in turn indicated not as. something clear, but instead an open question, constantly being raised. The treatment of colour plays a great role, with both a transparency and a fluidity, as well as the materials and the pictorial surface. While the technique is classical, oil paint on linen canvas, the use the artist makes of it produces here and there effects close to non-painting, or at least an effacement. The manner that it has been formed as in a fresco – the way of taking colours in the depth of a pictorial layering – resonates in the paradoxical density that it gives her spaces, in a continuity between them and all the various forms they contain: such are the driving forces of this delicate and yet radiant sensuality which can be felt on contemplation.

Just as the mist lifts in the morning through condensation and evaporation, as the sap rises in springtime in the trunks of trees towards their growing leaves, life, in its intense mellowness, innervates these paintings, in which the slightest green filament, the least red space, the slightest splash and the smallest blossoming become the most precious manifestations. By quoting the first line of T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, “April is the cruellest month”, Nino Kapanadze gives her works a season; to be precise, she places them between the winter that witnessed their birth and the springtime that begins at the moment when they are displayed. When winter turns towards spring, such a crossing-over suggests colours, from whites to greens, of a life flowing back in a tenuous return. Like that “awakened day, which still wore the moon as a necklace like a silver gem” as evoked by Robert Walser (1), or the “stuttered-over-again world” that Paul Celan (2) attempted to convey, there can here be felt the fluttering of beginnings. And, quite naturally, we are led towards poetry and the way in which meaning arises from it, which, like a cloud, in the words of Pierre Alferi “offers itself and recedes, unfolds, holds back”: “While disengaging itself, it adopts a certain figure, like a smoke ring. Fully heard and felt, each phrase leaves behind the memory of a volume with fleeting borders, which more or less melds with previous ones. And, when looking up from the book, we can see these memories with their shifting, mobile forms, as they cohabitate, become joined or disjointed.” (3)

In Interruption we see a figure, obscured by veils, hands open over a closed book with clouds of bright colours seemingly emanating from it, as with the genie of the lamp, mottling the greater part of the surface. So, with veils, various frames (windows, tiling, encasings, crannies), whose function is not to circumscribe or block what cannot be contained, but instead to reveal, even fleetingly, what has just been inscribed within them, like those tiny white dots that form the pearls of a necklace (those are pearls that were his eyes) or fine white lines highlighting the contours of a hand and thus of a gesture, or which sketch out the curve of a shoulder and the roundness of a head. “White has a tendency to make things visible” (4), stated Robert Ryman, who wanted to paint paint, not white per se. In the same way, the use Nino Kapanadze makes of colours, which might be described as powdered, takes part in these arrangements that aim at capturing what is visible: because a ray of light is never seen more clearly than when it has been filtered and brought out by the various particles or projected images suspended in it. For, it is also light that, in a certain respect, reveals everything that is being diffused imperceptibly in the apparent transparency of the air. By trapping one another, light and dust reveal each other. Another passage from The Waste Land then comes to mind: “(Come in under the shadow of this red rock), / And I will show you something different from either / Your shadow at morning striding behind you / Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you; / I will show you fear in a handful of dust” (5). This is why self-portraits are made from behind, why figures have closed eyes or half-effaced traits that have barely been sketched out: they have been absorbed within themselves and in the paint, making them resonate even more. If they close their eyes to the light (all the lights you closed your eyes to), it is to make it radiate more, to be run through, since “being is being / pierced / daylit” (6), by the light that emerges from inside the paintings, from their very materials, as in the icons that Nino Kapanadze has so often observed in the churches of her native Georgia. And this is from where, via sensations, emotions emanate, like air being breathed out and forming a mist on the surface of a mirror, disturbing reflections and signifying life.

Guitemie Maldonado, mars 2024

1 Robert Walser, At Dawn. (Our translation.)

2 Paul Celan, Stuttered-Over-Again World, translated by A.S. Kline, Twenty-Eight Poems, 2014. Available online:
https://www.poetsofmodernity.xyz/POMBR/German/Celan.php#contents

3 Pierre Alferi, “Météo du sens”, Chercher une phrase, Paris, Christian Bourgois éditeur, 1991, p. V. (Our translation.)

4 Robert Ryman, interview with Susan Sollins, “Color, Surface and Seeing”, Art 21, 13 December 2006.

5 T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land, Collected Poems, Faber & Faber, London, 2020.

6 P. Alferi, “douze airs”, Vacarme, n°24, 2003, p. 93. (Our translation.)

Le plus cruel des mois de Nino Kapanadze
Lever de couleur, montée des émotions

Il se dégage des dernières peintures de Nino Kapanadze une tonalité particulière, une lumière, une atmosphère, d’autant plus perceptible d’un tableau à l’autre que les formats en sont les mêmes – confortables pour le corps qui peint, accueillants pour celui qui regarde, pris à la verticale ou à l’horizontale, les tableaux tantôt isolés, tantôt accolés. Discrètement, cela pointe, au-delà, en deçà, en plus du sujet représenté, vers une recherche proprement picturale et sensorielle, portant sur l’espace de la peinture et les émotions qui peuvent en monter. Qu’il s’agisse d’arbres, de figures humaines, de livres, voire de murs ou autres éléments architecturaux, tout se manifeste ici en tant que présence plus ou moins évanescente, comme une émanation, une apparition aux confins d’un visible indiqué en retour non comme une évidence, mais comme une question ouverte, inlassablement posée. Le traitement de la couleur y est pour beaucoup, tout en transparence et en fluidité, ainsi que celui de la matière et de la surface picturale. Car si la technique est classique, peinture à l’huile sur toile de lin, l’emploi qu’en fait l’artiste produit par endroits des effets proches du non-peint, de l’effacement du moins. Qu’elle se soit formée à la fresque, à cette façon de faire prendre la couleur dans l’épaisseur de la couche picturale, résonne dans la densité paradoxale qu’elle imprime à ses espaces, dans la continuité entre eux et les formes de toute nature qui s’y logent : autant de ressorts de cette sensualité délicate et pourtant rayonnante que l’on éprouve en face d’eux.

Comme la brume se lève au matin par condensation et évaporation, comme la sève remonte au printemps dans les troncs vers les feuilles à pousser, la vie, avec une suavité intense, innerve ces peintures, où le moindre filament de vert, le moindre plan de rouge, la moindre éclaboussure et le moindre bourgeonnement en sont les plus précieuses des manifestations. Citant le premier vers de The Waste Land de T. S. Eliot, « Avril est le plus cruel des mois », Nino Kapanadze donne à ses œuvres une saison ; plus exactement, elle les situe entre l’hiver qui les a vues naître et le printemps qui débute au moment où elles sont exposées. Quand l’hiver va vers le printemps, c’est une telle traversée que suggèrent les couleurs, des blancs aux verts, de la vie qui reflue à son retour ténu. Telle cette « journée en éveil, qui portait encore en collier la lune comme un bijou d’argent » évoquée par Robert Walser (1), tel ce « monde à rebégayer » que tente de formuler Paul Celan (2), on éprouve ici le frémissement des débuts. Et l’on est conduit, assez naturellement, vers la poésie et la façon dont le sens y surgit, qui comme un nuage, selon Pierre Alferi, « s’offre et se refuse, se déplie, se réserve » : « Il adopte en se dégageant une certaine silhouette, comme un rond de fumée. Entendue et sentie pleinement, chaque phrase laisse le souvenir d’un volume aux bords évanescents, qui s’agrège plus ou moins aux précédents. Et l’on peut voir, en relevant les yeux du livre, ces souvenirs de formes floues mouvantes cohabiter, se joindre ou se disjoindre. » (3)

Et l’on regarde la figure d’Interruption, estompée par des voiles, les mains ouvertes au-dessus d’un livre fermé d’où semble émaner, tel le génie d’une lampe, des nuées de couleurs vives dont les moutonnements s’impriment à la majeure partie de la surface. Des voiles donc, des cadres divers (fenêtres, carrelages, châssis, encoignures), qui n’ont pas pour fonction de circonscrire ou d’arrêter ce qui ne peut l’être, mais de révéler, même fugitivement, ce qui vient s’y inscrire, à l’instar de ces infimes points blancs qui forment les perles d’un collier (Those are pearls that were his eyes) ou de ces fines lignes blanches qui soulignent les contours d’une main et par conséquent d’un geste ou dessinent la courbe d’une épaule et la rondeur d’une tête. « Le blanc a tendance à rendre les choses visibles. » (4), déclarait Robert Ryman qui voulait peindre la peinture, non le blanc en soi. De même, l’usage par Nino Kapanadze de couleurs que l’on pourrait dire poudrées participe-t-il de ces dispositifs visant à capter le visible : car on ne voit jamais aussi bien un rayon de lumière que filtré et souligné par les diverses particules ou images projetées qui y sont suspendues, car c’est aussi la lumière qui, sous un certain angle, fait apparaître tout ce qui se diffuse imperceptiblement dans l’apparente transparence de l’air. Lumière et poussières, en se piégeant, se révèlent. Et l’on pense à cet autre passage de The Waste Land : « (Viens t’abriter à l’ombre de ce rocher rouge) / Et je te montrerai quelque chose qui n’est / Ni ton ombre au matin marchant derrière toi, / Ni ton ombre le soir surgie à ta rencontre ; / Je te montrerai ton effroi dans une poignée de poussière. » (5) Voilà pourquoi les autoportraits se font de dos, pourquoi les figures ont les yeux fermés ou des traits à peine esquissés, à demi-effacés : en s’absorbant en elles-mêmes et dans la peinture, elles la font d’autant plus résonner. Si elles ont fermé les yeux à la lumière (All the lights you closed your eyes to), c’est pour mieux la faire rayonner, pour en être traversées, puisque « être c’est être / percé / à jour » (6), par la lumière qui vient de l’intérieur de la peinture, de sa matière même, comme dans les icônes que Nino Kapanadze a si souvent observées dans les églises de sa Géorgie natale. Et c’est de là, via les sensations, qu’émanent les émotions, comme le souffle s’exhale et se dépose en buée à la surface d’un miroir, troublant les reflets et signifiant la vie.

Guitemie Maldonado, mars 2024

1 Robert Walser, « À l’aube », Retour dans la neige, traduction Golnaz Houchidar, Genève, Éditions Zoé, 1999, p. 86.

2 Paul Celan, « Le monde à rebégayer », Partie de neige, traduction Jean-Pierre Lefebvre, Paris, Seuil, 2007, p. 27

3 Pierre Alferi, « Météo du sens », Chercher une phrase, Paris, Christian Bourgois éditeur, 1991, p. V.

4 Robert Ryman, entretien avec Susan Sollins, « Color, Surface and Seeing », Art 21, 13 décembre 2006.

5 Thomas Stearns Eliot, « La Terre vaine », La Terre vaine et autres poèmes, traduction Pierre Leyris, Paris, Éditions du Seuil, 1976, p. 63.

6 P. Alferi, « douze airs », Vacarme, n°24, 2003, p. 93.

FR : The cruellest month by Nino Kapanadze Raising colours, arising emotions A particular tonality emerges from Nino Kapanadze’s most recent paintings, a light, an atmosphere, all the more perceptible from one picture to the next as the formats are identical – comfortable for the body that paints, welcoming to the viewer, take...
EN: Le plus cruel des mois de Nino Kapanadze Lever de couleur, montée des émotions Il se dégage des dernières peintures de Nino Kapanadze une tonalité particulière, une lumière, une atmosphère, d’autant plus perceptible d’un tableau à l’autre que les formats en sont les mêmes – con...
Read more…

I can connect nothing with nothing (Piscine municipale), 2024, Oil on linen, 2 panels — 195 × 130 cm (each)

I can connect nothing with nothing (Piscine municipale), 2024 
Detail

I can connect nothing with nothing (Piscine municipale), 2024 
Detail

Interruption, 2023, Oil on linen, 195 × 130 cm

Interruption, 2023 
Detail

Interruption, 2023 
Detail

Those are pearls that were his eyes (Portrait of an artist), 2023, Oil on linen, 195 × 130 cm

Those are pearls that were his eyes (Portrait of an artist), 2023 
Detail

Those are pearls that were his eyes (Portrait of an artist), 2023 
Detail

These fragments I have shored against my ruins (I), 2023, Oil on linen, 22 × 27 cm
These fragments I have shored against my ruins (II), 2023, Oil on linen, 22 × 27 cm

HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME, 2023, Oil on linen, 195 × 130 cm

HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME, 2023 
Detail

HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME, 2023 
Detail

The cruellest month, 2023, Oil on linen, 130 × 195 cm

The cruellest month, 2023 
Detail

The cruellest month, 2023 
Detail

Rue Pergolèse, 2023, Oil on linen, 130 × 195 cm

Rue Pergolèse, 2023 
Detail

Rue Pergolèse, 2023 
Detai

All the lights you closed your eyes to, 2023, Oil on linen, 195 × 130 cm

All the lights you closed your eyes to, 2023 
Detail

All the lights you closed your eyes to, 2023 
Detail





Work views: Alex Kostromin
Exhibition views: Martin Argyroglo